Tag Archives: ability

Case Study: Patagonia Makes Questions Easy To Answer

A major challenge with designing health questionnaires is making sure that questions are both clinically meaningful and are easy for users to answer. One example has to do with hip-to-waist ratio, which can be an important indicator of heart health. I’ve seen health risk assessments ask people their hip and waist measurements, but how many people know those measurements without checking? And how many people have a tape measure close at hand to take the measurement? Even using your clothing size as a proxy is likely to be inaccurate since so many brands use vanity sizing or are inconsistent with other brands (I learned in a recent closet clean-out that I have every size from XS to XL in my closet, and they fit me). Continue reading Case Study: Patagonia Makes Questions Easy To Answer

Behavior Change Truth: Action Is Harder Than Inaction

One category of behavioral economics judo is flipping from opt-in to opt-out.  More people enroll in 401ks when they have to uncheck the box to join, as opposed to checking it. And more people will pay their credit cards in full if the default is to do so, rather than to go on a payment plan. The real magic underlying the opt-out, though, is simple: Action is harder than inaction. Make the desired behavior passive, and it’s more likely to happen. Continue reading Behavior Change Truth: Action Is Harder Than Inaction

Want a Clean Park? Think Ability Support

As someone whose primary mode of transportation is on foot, I’m probably more annoyed than most by people who don’t clean up after their dogs. A day stepping in dog poop is pretty much a day ruined. That said, I get why it happens sometimes. A lot of areas don’t have convenient trash cans, and people may not have plastic bags to pick up the poop. Shit happens. Yes, that pun was 100% intended. Continue reading Want a Clean Park? Think Ability Support